Benefits Of Resistance Training For Women

Many women don’t seriously consider weight training when deciding on an exercise program. Perhaps it’s because they believe it won’t help them with their goals of muscle toning and weight loss. Believe it or not, however, once you start weight training, your body will burn calories more efficiently. Within only a few months you will see a dramatic change in the shape of the body you see in the mirror. You will be more sleek and athletic. Your metabolism will have changed and you will have more energy and less fatigue. You health will take a dramatic shift for the better. You’ll have a stronger immune system. And what’s more, studies have shown that lifting weights fights osteoporosis.

Five Reasons Why Women should be Weight Training:

1) Your Body Will Burn Calories More Efficiently
As you weight train and eat enough protein will gain muscle mass in all the right places without getting bulky. Supposedly you burn 35 to 50 calories a day for every pound of muscle mass. As you gain more muscle you will burn more calories. Don’t be afraid of getting as muscular as some bodybuilding guy. That is but one of many myths. Women have 10 to 30 times less of the hormone physiology than men that brings on muscle hypertrophy (big muscles).

2) Change in the Shape of Your Body Better than Cardiovascular Exercise
There was a university study done in which a certain amount of subjects were asked to do cardio such as walking and the same amount were asked to weight train as their main exercise. After a certain period of time, given the same low calorie diet with the same food, both groups lost pounds. The cardio group lost fat and unfortunately some muscle whereas the weight training group lost only fat. You’ll burn body fat and not valuable muscle with weight lifting.

3) Strengthens Immune System
First of all, your muscles ARE your metabolism. Improve the condition the condition of your muscles and you improve your metabolic condition to reduce disease and infection. Pumping iron increases your resting metabolism and decreases your blood pressure. Regular weight training also decreases bad cholesterol (LDL) and increases good cholesterol (HDL).

4) Increases and Restores Bone Density
As we grow older we tend to lose bone density. It has been well known for some time that regular weight bearing exercises prevent osteoporosis and maintain healthy bone density. If you don’t use it you lose it. If you’re still young then start weight training now. If you’re older, it’s never too late to start exercising no matter how old you get. Exercise such as resistance training also helps the brain because lifting weights is good for your heart and whatever is good for your heart is good for your mental functions. The one way in which our muscles are different than other parts of our bodies is that our muscles do not age. It’s true.

5) Improves Circulation and Produces Endorphins
Exercise such as lifting weights improves circulation dramatically, strengthens joints and releases those natural pain killers in the brain called endorphins. Joints and tendons are strengthened and in some cases, sufferers of chronic mild arthritis may experience some pain relief from a little light weight training as well as enjoying increased lean muscle mass.

Ease into a Workout Plan
A recommendation would be to train two to three times a week and not with machines but with free weights because machines don’t build up the bones like free weights do. Start out slow. At first do a couple pushing exercises such as bench press and overhead press. Do a couple pulling exercises such as bent rows and upright rows. And do squats. For each exercise do a set or two of ten to twelve reps. You should rest a few minutes in between sets. The weight you use shouldn’t be too heavy. And eat plenty of protein. Muscles don’t grow out of thin air. It is recommended to consume A? to 1 gram of protein for every pound of lean body weight. If you’re on a weight loss program start on a calorie deficient nutritional plan and watch that body fat melt off. Remember that if you choose to start any kind of exercise plan, consult first with your physician.